Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Gallus, Jacobus Handl. (1550-1591) Moralia-Harmoniae Morales (Excerpts)

New acquisition.
Bought in February 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: April/June 1999.
Recording venue: Court Chapel St. Georg, Regensburg. Germany.
Recording engineer: Andreas Werner.
Running time: 72:12.
Classical relevance: Worthwhile.

Works performed:
See heading.

Works performed by:
Singer Pur.
Guest singers added:
Dorothee Mields, Soprano.
Gordon Jones, Baritone.

As expected, because their renown preceded them, this disc is in all respects a winner. As an added delight the soprano Dorothee Mields is a temporary member to the choir, not to mentioned the very well known baritone Gordon Jones. Sonically as well as artistically this disc is a huge success to my ears. The works by Gallus get a thorough run by Singer Pur, and not a single note is lost or hidden in their interpretation. The softness and delicacy is present in abundance, which underlines my dissatisfaction with some other choirs of which I spoke on occasion on this blog. For me Singer Pur chose the right path of singing, in practically all instances. I am aware that this is a very personal statement, that holds true for me, but many others will and might disagree. Gallus is treated with a lot of respect, and the booklet is clarifying this in lucid terms. Most of the listeners will understand what is written there. The music is of a high intellectual quality, and the texts used from humanistic philosophers of old, like Ovid, Horace and more of those fellows. The music is perfectly matched to those texts, and glorifies both arts.The recording is as always with Singer Pur excellent.
Recommended.






Monday, March 28, 2016

On my order list.....

For 13€ this is really a no brainer, with some very interesting performances.



Interesting composers, fine organ and excellent performer.



Friday, March 25, 2016

Desprez, Josquin. (c.1450-1521) Missa Hercules dux Ferrarie. Motets and Chansons.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Glissando.
Recording dates: August 2001.
Recording venue: Bowdoin College Chapel, Brunswick, Maine, USA.
Recording engineer: Mark Donahue. (Soundmirror, Boston)
Running time: 62:00.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
See heading.

Works performed:
Pomerium, Alexander Blachly.

Always prepared for a novelty I am, but I did not expect to find another choir as good as Singer Pur, but lo and behold, out of the United States flies in by express fortitude Pomerium, a choir that was virtually unknown by me, but which bowled me over by the sweetness of voices and its demeanor and expression in their singing. The pronunciation is near perfect, the balance and volume between voices almost eerie in its accomplishment. 4 female voices, yet neither of them screaming, but keeping a perfectly sweet pitch, searing high towards heaven, yet never into uncouth realms. The males set a solid basis to it all with 2 basses that are slightly raised in volume, and thereby give it a deep spiritual meaning. A very good choir to sum it up. What they do with Desprez his music is bordering on the magical, and the rewards they gain by diving deep into choral meditation is pretty revealing. Desprez has more to say then I sometimes hear in other recordings. I love what is on offer on this disc, and am thoroughly surprised by what I hear, which is a good thing for there are another 2 CD'S lying around from the same choir. 
The recording is special in that it creates a mood that fits perfectly with what is sung.
Recommended.





Zipoli, Domenico. (1688-1726) Complete Keyboard Music.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Brilliant.
CD 1 of 2.
Recording dates: November 2014.
Recording venue: Church of SS Peter and Paul, Castelnuovo, Scrivia, Italy.
Recording engineer: Federico Savio.
Running time: 76:10.
Classical relevance: In the light of having almost no complete recordings, essential.

Works performed:
Toccata/Versi/Canzonas/All'Elevazione I & II/Offeratorio/Pastorale.
Transcription of Corelli's Sonata, opus 5, No. 7.

Performed by:
Carlo Guandalino.

Instrument:
This pipe organ appears to be the oldest in the territory of Alessandria going back to 1612, built by the brothers Angelo and Giuseppe Vitani, and subsequently revised by Luigi Amati in 1796. In the Ripieno column is a Principal Bass 12', and in the Concert column a Trombone Pedal 12' giving the organ a firm basis.

I do not think that Zipoli's keyboard work was ever completely recorded, so it was a wonderful surprise that Brilliant picked this up, and using such a fine organ is a extra bonus. Now do not expect to be stunned by this music, for though it undoubtedly holds some fine music, it will not impress to such an extent that you will fall into spontaneous rejoicing. His style is a bit stiff, with not enough melody lines or colour to spice the whole procedure up to such an extent that you actually are able to listen continuously. So if not really remarkable it has nevertheless enough footholds to keep in the vicinity of this composer. It's easy to be in two minds about Zipoli's music, but neither side will win, so the balance keeps you in. My ticket to keep this recording is firstly the organ and secondly the music. Carlo Guandalino the organist has a spectacular CV. He seems to be on top of everything and finished his master with the maximum honours. After reading this I expected a bit more fantasy in his playing, but he seems to be resolved stoically to give a very measured performance. Now I am not saying that his playing is defective, but part of the stiffness in this music is caused by him. At least to my ears.
Be that as it may, Zipoli stays in! He is one of those composer that make me understand his musical era better and on a more solid basis then if I had to do without him.
The sound is quite good.



Bargiel, Woldemar. (1828-1897) Complete Orchestral Music, Volume I.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Toccata Classics.
Recording dates: June/July 2014.
Recording venue: Omsk Philharmonic Hall, Siberia.
Recording engineer: Sergei Zhigunov.
Running time: 76:06.
Classical relevance: Mildly interesting.

Works performed: 
Symphony in C major, opus 30. (1864)
Overtures:
To a tragedy, opus 18. (1856)
To Prometheus, opus 16. (1852: Rev, 1854 and 1859)
To Medea, opus 22. (1861)

Performed by:
Siberian SO, Dimitry Vasilyev.

A short while ago I played some chamber music by Woldemar Bargiel, and was quite captivated by its originality, so I dared to venture into his orchestral oeuvre without hesitation. Now before I start writing about this composer, you have to know a few facts that shaped his music, otherwise you might misunderstand my words. 
>Bargiel is a transition composer, so he is a typical representative  of the Mid nineteenth century, mediating between two epochs. His pluralist style should thus be seen not as derivative and eclectic, but rather as a sophisticated and multifaceted combination of musical styles in a transitional period< This conclusion may hold 80% of the truth, but fact is that Bargiel does not stand on his own legs. One leg is called Robert Schumann, and the other leg is Ludwig van Beethoven. This is a predominant fact, which you will clearly hear in the music. There is no mistaking that Beethoven pops around the corner in every piece Bargiel wrote, a little less probably in the overture to Medea, which all together holds more content from Bargiel as all the other works on this disc. Now we all know that every composer from whatever era grows his music on the yield in a garden of a composer that was before him, which is only natural, and frankly everyone did this, had to. Development and progress is always based of what has gone before, so it is in life as in music. There is no shame in it. The question is, how much is tolerable, and when, one has become a true disciple of others and so obliterated one's own stance?  His thematic material breaths Beethoven/Schumann in which is little originality, but nevertheless clever writing, and interweaving of themes. His scoring is vigorous, with an energetic drive, and little or no sentimentality in his compositions, which I found rather odd, considering the time he lived in. He did not cut a niche for himself, but lived as a lodger on safe grounds created by others. Not innovative, which you could reasonably expect, but rather an conservative composer. Adventure is not his aim or forte, but he sure writes music to like, if not to remember. What I think is important is the harmonic and dynamic inventiveness throughout all he wrote.
Expect in his symphony a lot of pointers towards Beethoven, and in the Strings Schumann. This also goes for the overtures, apart from the Medea already mentioned. Is the music worthwhile to have. For me yes, because this transitional period, albeit conservatively  translated into his music, has a function in my understanding of Bargiel's compositions and the period he lived in.
The sound is quite good, and the performance polished and sure footed.



Thursday, March 24, 2016

Music from Spain's Golden Age.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: February 2004.
Recording venue: WDR Funkhaus KvB Saal. Germany
Recording engineer: Walburga Dahmen.
Running time: 49:35.
Classical relevance: A pleasure to have.

Works performed: 
Diverse composers from the 15th and 16th century.
All works are are arranged by Torsten Muller, Flutes and percussion.

Performed by:
Flautando Koln.
Added soloists: 
Ursula Thelen, Sopran.
Torsten Muller: A whole array of percussion.

This is one of the CD'S that came in today, and since I had some 50 minutes to spare I chucked this CD in the player, and immediately was surprised by the percussion that came crystal clear into my listening room, thereby saying that this is a State of the Art recording. I did not expect this kind of music, for it never crossed my mind that all music are arrangements. But after getting acclimatized to this fact, I actually started to enjoy what I heard, Swinging rousing music that opened up unknown fiestas, all done by a very professional ensemble, and the sublime reworkings of the music by Muller. He has taste and a good musical sense, in that he never adds anything that would be anachronistic to the very core of the music. And the truth is that the music bears up well to this treatment. I even think that the original composers would have nodded appreciatively while listening. The synergy between all participants is such, that it makes for a wonderful 50 minutes of pure bliss. And all are understandably enthusiastic. I am too. I bought it for a song, but would have paid full price, would I have known how perfect the music is.
This was the second disc I bought with Flautando Koln, and I have a hunch that it will not be the last one.
Recommended.



Music at the Court of Emperor Rudolf II in Prague.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: June 1991.
Recording venue: Evangelical Church, Honrath, Germany.
Recording engineer: Georg Litzinger.
Running time: 2 CD'S: 92:00
Classical relevance: Well worth having.

Works recorded:
Jacob Regnart, Lamentabatur Jacob, & Einstmals in einem tiefen Tal.
Carl Luython, Lamentationes Jeremiae Prophetae. 
Fuga Suavissima, for Organ.
Giovanni Pierluigi Palestrina, Vestiva i Colli.
Philipp de Monte, Missa sex Vocum.

Performed by:
Dialogo Musicale, Leo Meilink.

What an unexpected pleasure this twofar is, which dropped out of thin air. I did not expect anything, but got my hands full, with goodies. It just came with a lot of other CD'S for next to nothing. I just went for the composers and the samples I heard, albeit very short ones. But there was a sweetness and openness about what I heard that made me go for it, fully expecting it to go into the refusal bin, as with much of the vocal music I try. By now I have a huge pile of rejected misfits in my closet. But that's the curse of the collector I guess. Anyways there is not a single weakness to be found in the music or performance. As for the sound it's almost state of the art. And what a surprise to see familiar voices, like Suzie Leblanc, Barbara Borden, and Marion van Bruggen no less, she must be ancient, also Adelheid Glatt from which I did not know she was still performing. And also on the Organ, Dutch born Bernhard Winsemius, also of a considerable age. But hold on, of course this was made in 1991. Go figure. As strange as it may sound, all works on this venture, voices, instruments, choir, recording, interpretation, all one big ball of pleasure. Do not make the mistake that unbridled pleasure can hold no excellence, there is! And a superb booklet to boot, could a collector wish more? One of the composers Dutch based Philipp de Monte, wrote an enormous amount of Madrigals, 1000 no less, plus 320 Motets and 38 masses. What a massive creativity must have bubbled inside him. His Missa sex vocum, is all what you could wish for in a work from this time, a polyphonic pleasure bursting with colours and meaning, (music and text) Take Jacob Regnart for instance, very bleak he comes of with just 200 sacred works, but not less in quality. He can stand alongside Monte without losing face. The music is equally pleasurable. Carl Luython was a big question mark for me, never saw his name, never heard music by his hands, but on the basis of what is presently recorded, he must have been a master in his own right. For his polyphonic writing has all the hallmarks of being well versed in the secrets of counterpoint. The Fuga he wrote for Organ, is as fine as any I heard from the same period. Winsemius plays on a organ built in 1863, but I could not find any info who build that instrument. Even looked on the site of that church, but no mention of it. So I keep open for suggestions, anyone? Palestrina's Vestiva i colli, a madrigal for 5 voices, is well sung, but I could have done without the forceful volume at times. 
But all in all I think this is a fantastic set, and a virtual bargain to boot.
Very much recommended.



Vaet, Jacobus. (c.1529-1567) Te Deum Laudamus, Motets, Magnificat, Missa Quodibetica.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: January 2004.
Recording venue: Evangelical Church Wolfenweiler, Germany.
Recording engineer: Manual Braun.
Running time: 57:48.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
See heading.

Works performed by:
Dufay Ensemble.

This is the second disc of the Dufay ensemble, and the music of Jacobus Vaet I am listening too. The first impression I had from Volume 1 was overpowering for the sheer novelty of Vaet's brilliantly composed music. And in that respect this second volume only enhances that impression. The ensemble and music are a perfectly fitted body, and can only bring as a result vocal perfection. The only quibble I have again as in the first volume is the countertenor Alain Ebert. The quality of his voice is without question really very good. He reaches top notes seemingly without problems, and there are no hints of distortions in his voice,, just clean as a whistle. My problem has to do with the balance of the voices in the choir. There is a impressive array of tenors through baritone and bass in this choir that makes the lower regions positively magical and distinctive, so no problems there, only plaudits, but the conductor thinks, that the countertenor should come on top quite forcefully at times, and so the choir balance gets interrupted by a voice that is pregnant with too much volume. It could easily be less and still distinctive enough to make a mark, but without interrupting the flow of the rest of the choir, that at least is my impression, and the reason for instance why I avoid the Sixteen choir under Harry Christopher albeit be it for the high pitching sopranos, as with the Tallis scholars being forcefully overcooked by Peter Philips. In both cases a choir balance I abhor.
The quality of the Dufay ensemble is impressive despite, and because of that I will pledge my allegiance to their efforts, and silently hope they could adapt the countertenor a bit more toward a global harmony. Of course I realize this sound is a choice of choir and director, or so I hope, so I am merely stating my own preference.
The gregorian chanting in the Missa is impressive, very well spaced and with a perfect declamation, which is an aspect of all what is sung on this CD.
As to Vaet, I am at a loss why this great master was so shamefully neglected, although it is a common practice with many composers as I well know from my long listening experience. Well at least his music is starting to get recorded, and I silently hope, that the Singer Pur choir might find space or generosity to dab also in the musical pool of Jacobus Vaet, without dismissing the Dufay ensemble, for they are quite valuable too, and deserve their place in the musical pantheon of greats.
Sound is good, and the performance apart from my personal quibble is excellent, although there is no material yet to compare.







Graun, Johann Gottlieb. (1702-1771) Sinfonias and Flute Music.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: NCA
Recording dates: November 2002.
Recording venue: Schlosstheater Rheinsberg, Germany.
Recording engineers: KammertonStudio Berlin.
Running time: 56:06.
Classical relevance: Essential to my ears.


Works performed:
5 Sinfonias for diverse combinations.
2 Horns, 2 Violins, Viola, and Harpsichord, or BC. (2)
2 violins, Viola and BC. (2)
Flute, Violin and BC.
Concerto for Flauto Terzetto, 2 Violins and BC.

Performed by:
Ensemble barock ACUUT.

Again a unknown ensemble to me, but after a period of listening, I felt quite familiar with their approach of the music by Graun. Graun is a very good composer, who did not write trash music, but always maintained a high quality of composing. His music is electrifying and a great stimulus to explore all what he has written. I exclude for myself vocal music of course, but that's personal. Their use of authentic instruments, or copies of it, is to my ears quite unique. The sparseness of their ornamentation, and not overstretching added vibrato makes this a prime meal for me. It is melodically all strong music, well written, every note in the score, and his combination of instruments works wonderfully efficient. The soloistic contributions thrill me, for it is as clean as white linnen and as quirky as a cricket in the field. What especially got to me was the the performance of the harpsichordist Ulrike Wappler, a pupil of Christine Schornsheim. Her playing send a tinkling through my spine, a gentle but distinctive  touche. Touche for me!   The string section had my admiration throughout, all fine musicians. The balance and coherence in this ensemble is remarkable. All is perfectly recorded by a coryfee in the business, Maria Suschke.
Recommended.








Factor Orbis. Sacred Vocal Music of the Renaissance.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: April 1996.
Recording venue: Rittersaal im Herzogenschloss, Straubing
Recording engineer: Christoph Martin Frommen.
Running time: 65:48.

Works performed: 
Vocal music from:

Tomas Luis de Victoria.
Orlando di Lasso.
Josquin des Prez.
Ludwig Senfl.
Cypriano de Rore.
Alexander Utendal.
Conrad Rupsch.
Jacob Obrecht.
Philippe de Monte.
Ranlequin de Mol.
Hans Leo Hassler.
Jacobus Gallus.
William Byrd.
Carlo Gesualdo di Venosa.

Performed by:
Singer Pur.

This recording has still the original soprano they started with, namely Caroline Hoglund. Her voice is a bit more clear and forward as the present soprano, Hedwig Westhoff Duppmann. What's in a name huh? But I like them both for they fit in perfectly in the choir balance Singer Pur always maintained. And this balance in voices, and applied volume they produce have me attracted every time when I put a CD from them in my player. Not often is a choir so utterly convincing in the sound they produce, so I am happy that I can say 100% yes to this choir, and hope they keep to their chosen path.
Now this CD is a gem in every respect. Apart from the perfect interpretation, the sheer overpowering amount of excellent composers, with the best of their music makes for an aural bliss every minute this CD lasts. Never before did I so enjoy the music as with Singer Pur's approach, and that says something, at least in my books. Whatever composer they tackle, the result is to my ears perfect, so it knows no disappointments, or drawbacks, it is simply as it ought to be.
The recording by Frommen is excellent, as I am expecting from an engineer with his qualities.










Bruch, Max. (1838-1920) Complete Works for Violin & Orchestra, Volume I.

New acquisition.
Bought in February 2016.
First listen.
Label: CPO.
Recording dates: June 2013.
Recording venue: Grosser Sendesaal, NDR Hannover, Germany.
Recording engineer: Daniel Kemper.
Running time: 70:20
Classical relevance: Should be high on your list.

Works performed:
Violin Concerto No. 2, opus 44.
Scottish Fantasy, opus 46.
Adagio Appassionato, opus 57.

Works performed by:
Antje Weithaas, Violin.
NDR Radiophilharmonie, Hermann Baumer.

When I saw this release I thought blimey another recording of the Violin works of Bruch of which there are a thousand commercial recordings already, and some of them very good. The last I bought were on the label Hyperion, and I found them to be pretty good. But listening to the samples of the CPO recording something stuck me as unique, sort of a novelty hidden under the surface, but for attentive ears immediately noticeable. So my reasoning was, that for that kind of surprise I am willing to dip into the overcrowded pool. Weithaas is no doubt one of the greatest violinists Germany brought forth. She may be not that well known globally, but that does not mean anything, for connoisseurs will instantly sense what kind of a novelty she is, and how much she is contributing to the success of this recording. Her approach is one of awareness towards Bruch's underlying melodies, not only the top layer, but all the layers beneath the surface, which Weithaas makes us aware of by her sensitive and noble interpretation. And in the process keeps all the other balls in the air, by seamlessly interweaving the prime melody line with all the other notes Bruch wrote in his Violin concertos, but which are most of the time neglected by other performers. Not all mind. Weithaas does that in such a way that I felt listening to a completely new concert. No doubt helped by an orchestra that not only accompanies her in every turn and twist, but keeps the concert afloat by a very nuanced approach toward the scoring, which Bruch made special too. It is on an equal footing with the notes written for the violin. Equal partners, equals perfection. For me it is a first time, that I hear actually all what Bruch meant us to hear. At least that is my assessment. Romanticism at its very best, in fact it does not come better as this.
Baumer and orchestra did an excellent job, so I will give these recordings preference above the others I have, and look forward to the second volume.
The recording is top notch.



Praetorius, Hieronymus. (1560-1629) Praetorius, Jacob. (1586-1651) Organ Works.

New acquisition.
Bought in February 2016.
First listen.
Label: Oehms.
Recording dates: August 2013.
Recording venue: St. Stephan, Tangermunde.
Recording engineer: Stefan Briegel.
Running time: 77:00.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:

H. Praetorius.
Hymnus: Christe Qui Lux, Dies absoluti, Christ unser Herr, zum Jordan kam, Te Lucis.
Magnificat: Quinti Toni.

J. Praetorius.
Praeambulum ex d.
Was kann uns kommen and fur Not.
Von allen Menschen abgewandt.
Magnificat Tertu Toni.

Performed by:
Joseph Kelemen.
Instrument: Scherer Organ, 1624. Tangermunde.
Pitch a'=486 at 15 C.
Wind pressure: 75 mm WS.
Meantone after Praetorius.

>Both composers take you to the threshold between the Renaissance to the early Baroque, including the beginnings of the North German Organ Music<  Crossroads that are musically very exciting. And that is exactly what you get, music that thrills all senses in your body and mind. The Scherer organ is a gem and sounds fantastic in this recording, and gets a warm and atmospheric reading, breathing the air of the past. Kelemen excels again in this repertoire, and gets every little nuance out of both composers on this disc. The stylistic differences are there, but I had the distinct feeling, that what happened in the music was almost seamlessly woven into a harmonious unity.  Kelemen always gets the right approach towards music of this era. No sluggish tempi, but a forward drive that makes his playing a galant experience, for he has an intrinsic feel for what is right and wrong, and to my ears gets it all right. The music is a marvel, and makes for essential listening if interested in the period and instrument. The sound is a great compliment to the organ. It shines and sparkles.
Recommended!




Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Papandopulo, Boris. (1906-1991). Orchestral Works.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: CPO.
Recording dates: May/June 2013.
Recording venue: Small Hall of Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall, Zagreb.
Recording engineer: Bernhard Hanke.
Running time: 67:45.
Classical relevance: Essential music.

Works performed:
Concerto for Piano & String orchestra No. 2.
Sinfonietta for String orchestra, opus 79.
Pintarichiana for String orchestra..

Performed by:
Oliver Triendl, Piano.
Zagreb Soloists, Sreten Krstic.

A great unknown composer to me. I saw a year ago the announcement of this release and received a positive review about it, but I never got as far as to buy it. Eventually it landed on my desk. And I am greatly surprised by the uniqueness of the music, and wondering why this composer was utterly forgotten. The booklet gives a lot of info on his life and working conditions, the explanation of his music is as always with CPO too technical and not understandable for the average music lover. When will they realize that this bit is almost never read in the booklet. It is very easy to write in a comprehensible way for all. In the end you will have a better understanding of the music. But alas maybe I hope for too much.
The music came as a huge and pleasant surprise. This composer is versatile, and I mean really versatile! He wrote in every imaginable style and all genres which such a creativity and bordering on the geniality, that I regularly had to take a deep gasp. He moves from one end of the scale to the other which such ease and fantasy, that he shames many a composer from his time and after. You may name any emotions or descriptions in your fantasy, and you will find it back in the music, with all the colours and magic you can conjure. This man has more than 450 compositions to his name, and if the present disc is anything to go on, he certainly is one of the very greats. His orchestrations are sublime and  his voice unique. His creativity is sheer boundless. There is not a single moment of boredom in his music, just sample the second movement "Andantino con moto from his Concerto for Piano and String  orchestra, which is sheer magic or the second movement of the Sinfonietta, "Elegia", is so beautiful it almost hurts my heart. And then the Neo Baroque influences from Pintarichiana, very captivating and exhilarating. I am still flabbergasted by the music. The recording and performance are first rate. Due to the fact that his musical estate is not completely accessible, there is little in the way to be recorded.
Absolutely recommended! Do not miss this.




Raff, Joseph Joachim. (1822-1882). Violin Concertos.

New acquisition.
Bought in February 2016.
First listen.
Label: Tudor.
Recording dates: May 2999.
Recording venue: Sinfonie an der Regnitz, Bamberg, Germany.
Recording engineer: Herbert Fruhbauer.
Running time: 70:07.
Classical relevance: Essential for all Raff enthusiasts. 

Works performed:
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No 1, opus 161, in B minor (1870/71) 
No. 2, opus 206. (1877) in A minor.
Cavatina for Violin and Orchestra, opus 85, No. 3. (1859)
Ungarischer for Violin and Orchestra, opus 203. (1876)

Performed by:
Michaela Paetsch, Violin.
Bamberger Symphoniker, Hans Stadlmair.

Another Tudor recording of Raff's music that was missing in my collection, redressed now by a fine offer which I could not resist.
>There is only a limited number of great Violin concertos, particularly of the Romantic era . Raff's Violin concertos certainly deserve a place beside those of his contemporaries. At the time, Raff was actually considered one of Germany's greatest living composers. Hearing the music on this disc one wonders why his music has been so forgotten, like all his other music by the way. Raff's voice has a moving resonance,not always very deep perhaps, but original and unique. Raff's idiom has a natural elegance, his orchestration is always skillful and his orchestral colours creatively varied. In the background is always the romantic inspiration, which is full of noble expression and features virtuosity and lyricism< Both Violin concertos are ravishingly beautiful as are both the small added works on this CD. The second Violin concerto has a short story to it, for it was dedicated to Pablo de Sarasate, and was scheduled to be premiered by him, but to the composer's great chagrin he wriggled out of it. Probably to difficult for him!
The recording made it Regnitz is full and warm, somewhat woolly, so not all detail is clearly audible. But never mind that, there is much to be enjoyed here.






Pachelbel, Johann. (1653-1706) Miscellaneous Organ Works.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Oehms.
Recording dates: November 2005 and May 2006.
Recording venues: Augustiner Eremiten Kirche Pappenheim and St Petri, Erfurt Bussleben, Germany.
Recording engineers: Stefan Briegel & Gerhard Gruber.
Running time: 75:08.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
See heading.

Works performed by:
Joseph Kelemen.

Instruments:
Stertzing Organ, 1702. ( See for all details previous recording)
Crapp Organ, 1722.
Wind pressure: 60 mm WS.
Pitch: a'= 476 Hz.
c. ein Halbton uber heute ublichem Stimmton, Werckmeister III.

A very good opportunity to compare both organist in a few works that are on both CD'S. There is not much overlap though, but enough to hear a huge difference in interpretation and recording,
Kelemen's take on Pachelbel is near perfect, and to my ears much better as the Sluys recording. To start with the recording of the Stertzing organ. The sonorities and tempi on the Kelemen disc are sublime, spot on. Much more natural as the frontal approach on the Sluys CD. 
Kelemen is livelier and wonderfully expressive. Pachelbel sounds rather complete and whole in his hands. It has simply more of the Zeitgeist, which I dearly missed in Sluys interpretation. The Ciacona in F minor, which is transposed to D minor, is a good example of Kelemen's superiority. He is clearly the master if it comes to Pachebel's  music. I so enjoyed what I heard. Kelemen plays the first part of the music on the Stertzing organ, and the other half on the Crapp organ, an instrument I like to hear,
Kelemen's does not disappoint me, but makes me listen with renewed enthusiasm to Pachelbel. I wished he recorded the complete organ music. This disc is a marvel and highly recommended.
Superior sound and interpretation.






Pachelbel, Johann. (1653-1706) Organ Works.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates:  September 2009.
Recording venue: Sankt Petri-Kirche, Erfurt-Bussleben, Germany.
Recording engineer: Harry de Winde.
Running time: 71:30.
Classical relevance: Interesting enough to have.

Works performed:
Miscellaneous Organ Works.

Performed by:
Jozef Sluys.

Instrument:
Sterzing Organ 1702.
Pitch: a'= c. 517 Hz.
Meantone temperament after Praetorius.

Pachelbel's organ works are virtually unknown these days, despite the fact that there are quite some recordings on the market. A little bird told me that the label Brilliant will eventually record all his works, and maybe Krebs is also a contender. I hope they choose the right organists and instruments, and a excellent sound engineer. Now that would be bliss!
During Pachelbel's life time he was highly regarded, proved by the circumstance that more than four collections of his organ works were printed and published. This alone proves that he had more to say that some mere musical trifles.  He was a good friend to many of the Bach family including the parents of Johann Sebastiaan Bach. Also, his fame as a composer and teacher was beyond reproach. Pachelbel had many influences and stimulus from the musical environment around him. > It is said that the entire work of Pachelbel presents an unique combination of Southern German polyphony and Northern German counterpoint.< And that is exactly what you hear on this recording. The Belgian organist Jozef Sluys is a musician who received many honours for his musical accomplishments. He was knighted and awarded countless medals and titles. Having previous heard Scheidemann by his hands my hopes were high for the Pachelbel recording, but that did not quite work out the way I expected.  His playing is one of ease and gentleness. There is little in the way excitement or enthusiasm, and therefore polyphony and counterpoint suffer in the process, but especially the polyphony. The tempi are at time laborious and a tad dragging. Little imagination, and so it comes down to a conservative interpretation. There are certainly moments of beauty in his playing, for instance in the somewhat slow Ciacona in D minor, and in the Choral "Meine Seele erhebt den Herren". For me this CD is a mixed bag of good and not so good things. Despite the slight criticisms I have, it is for me a worthwhile acquisition. I love the Sterzing organ, but find this recording a bit frontal and raw. The detail is clear though. The organ has a interesting history, well worth your time to Google.






Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Schickhardt, Johann Christian. (c.1682-1762) Six Concertos for 4 Flutes and BC.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: March 2001.
Recording venue: Funkhaus Karl von Bismarck Saal, Koln.
Recording engineer: Andreas Beutner.
Running time: 57:45.
Classical relevance: Well worth having.

Works performed:
As in the heading:
In C major/F major/D minor/E minor/G major/C minor.

Performed by:
Flautando Koln.
Tuning 415 Hz.
Harpsichord: After Mietke, made by Reinhard von Nagel.
Organ: Tuning after Bach and Kellner. (No mention on which organ)

I have to admit that Schickhardt was an unknown composer for me. Did not even see his name ever in my life. Well there must be a first time, and why not with this attractive disc?
He wrote really a considerable amount of music, especially chamber music, largely for wind instruments. Little is known about him and off his life as a composer, instrumental teacher and virtuoso. The present set of concertos for flutes seems to have been an oddity in his oeuvre. A lot of his works were also published in Holland, which meant that he was appreciated, showed by the many subscriptions on his works.  He lived mostly in the Netherlands and also died in Leiden in 1762. He writes easy music for your ears, not in the same league as Johann Sebastian Bach, or Antonio Vivaldi, but nevertheless elegant, melodically playable pieces for all that were dedicated to invest some study into his scores. The quality as there is does not suffer because of it. The music is of a optimistic kind, sunny and easy to enjoy and appreciate for what it is worth. Some may think that these concertos are a bit old fashioned for his time, but I beg to differ, especially with such likable music. The ladies of Flautando Koln are to be applauded for their mastery and professionalism on the Flutes. One rarely encounters such excellence. The sound is excellent as is the performance.
Can be safely recommended.








Monday, March 21, 2016

Pepusch, Johann Christoph. (1667-1752) Concertos and Overtures for London.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ramee.
Recording dates: July 2010.
Recording venue: Church of All Saints, Tooting, London, England.
Recording engineer: Rainer Arndt.
Running time: 59:16.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
Overture to The Beggar's opera in B flat major.
Concerto a 5, for Oboe, Strings and BC in G minor.
Concerto for Violin, Strings and BC in A major.
Concerto Grosso a 6 for Trumpet, Strings and BC in D major.
Concerto for Violin and Strings, BC in A minor.
Concerto Grosso for Violin Strings and BC in B flat major.
Concerto for a 6 for Cello, Bassoon, Strings and BC in F major.
Overture to Venus and Adonis in F major.

Works performed by:
The Harmonious Society of Tickle-Fiddle Gentlemen, Robert Rawson.

The ensembles name is indeed hilarious but has an origin in the time of Pepusch's music. The excellent booklet has plenty of info about it. Also a composer that not many know, let alone have music by his hands. By what I hear he is a galant and fine composer, with notable influences of Albinoni, Muffat, and Benedetto Marcello. His music is genial, well grafted, and of elegant proportions. Nothing small or slight in his music, but creative nobility. I really love to hear this kind of music, albeit totally forgotten. Many of the concertos on this disc are first recordings. By what I hear I would wish more Concertos from this composer, of which he wrote a good many of them. This disc shows what a versatile composer he was, and needs to be recorded more often.
The recording is first rate, as is the performance. Many fine soloistic contributions. 
Heartily recommended.






Pez, Johann Christoph. (1664-1716) Overtures-Concerti.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ramee.
Recording dates: December 2006.
Recording venue: Begijnhofkerk-Sint Truiden, Belgium.
Recording engineer: Rainer Arndt.
Running time: 76:41.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
Overture in B flat major.
Concert Sonata in F major.
Concerto Grosso/Sinfonia in G minor.
Sonata/Concert Simphonia in G major.
Overture/Pieces pour la Musique de Table in D minor.
Concert Pastoral in D major.

Works performed by:
Les Muffatti, Peter Van Heyghen.

The artistic level of music and ensemble is high. You may expect much and get more. Les Muffatti is a group of musicians whom created a perfect balance amongst them. All is played on authentic instruments. They keep to sensible tempi, and thereby unfolded many a detail that captures your imagination quickly. Tis also recorded in an involving way. You feel part of what is going on, and that makes the experience twice as good.
There cannot be many people that know this composer, well I for one never heard of him, and by reading the excellent booklet and listening to this disc, that is a certified if understandable omission. Not much is recorded of him, albeit the fact that his music is well documented by extensive research as early as in 1928. Why nothing came of it, is a riddle for me, and doubtlessly for many others, after hearing the quality and artistic integrity of the music. There are many influences in his music. Pez adapted to them, but still retaining his own voice. His instrumentation is on the same level as Telemann, who admired him and his compositions, even considered him on the top of his trade in his time. He was a representative of the "Vermischter Geschmack" = >Combined taste<., meaning that the music in question was not only of the highest compositional and expressive quality, but also displayed an exceptionally rich diversity of style and instrumentation. And this defines what you will hear, music to gladden your heart and mind alike. There are some more notable influences, namely from Corelli, Torelli, Steffani, Lully, just to name a few. The way he combined all those influences, says something about him as a creative mind. So for me this is a CD to have. The performance and recording could not be better.




Friday, March 18, 2016

Bach, J.S Complete Organ Music Volume 2 of the Stockmeier Edition. Second complete rerun.

I played this set completely from 13-3 till 18-3-2016. CD 1-10. Second rerun.
Too busy with the garden preparing it for the spring, so I pushed some Bach through my speakers, that would not tax me too much. Stockmeier does the job.
See for all the reviews March 2016, they are all listed.
Next week the diet will be more adventurous. 










Saturday, March 12, 2016

Bach, J.S. The Complete Organ Works. The Stockmeier Edition. CD 5-10

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Membran
CD 5-10 from 10.
Recording dates:  Between September 1977 and February 1981.
Recording venues:  
St. Johannis, Osnabruck, and Maria Himmelfahrt, Lorup (CD 5) 11-3-2016
Maria Himmelfahrt, Lorup and Wallfahrtskirche, Rulle. (CD 6)
St. Jacobus, Glane, Schlosskirche Bad Iburg, St. Laurentius, Langfjorden. (CD 7
St. Laurentius, Langfjorden and Vorfuhrorgel des Werkes, Osnabruck. (CD 8)
Vorfuhrorgel des werkes Osnabruck, St. Martinus, Hagen, St. Marien, Kloster, Oesede (CD 9.) 
St. Martinus, Hagen and St Marien, Kloster, Oesede. (CD 10)
All  recording places in Germany.

CD 5-10 played between 11-3 and 12-3-2016.

Works performed:
CD 5-10.
CD 5:  Choralbearbeitungen aus Clavier ubung, Teil III. (II) BWV 680-689. BWV 522.2.
            Kirnberger Chorale, BWV 619 bis 691a and 692-696.
CD 6:  Kirnberger Chorale (II) BWV 697-713. Einzeln uberlieferte choralbeartbeitungen, BWV 714- 
            715, and BWV 717-720.
CD 7:  Einzeln uberlieferte choralbearbeitungen, (II) BWV 721-734 and 736-739.
CD 8:  Einzeln uberlieferte choralbearbeitungen, (III)   BWV 740-759.
CD 9:  Einzeln uberlieferte choralbearbeitungen (IV) BWV 760, and 762-767. Variationen (I) BWV 769.
CD 10: Variationen (II) BWV 768-771.

All are new Kreienbrink Organs.

Performed by:
Wolfgang Stockmeier.

I have been in two minds about this set. On the one hand I hear a lot of beautiful things, but on the other side of this interpretation there is sameness, almost lethargy, and no depth in thought. What is also amiss is the intellectualism and a scientific strain in all proceedings. This is more a statement from Stockmeier, than a true representation of the composer Bach. Knowing what I know how Bach approached these works, and what he liked to hear in a performance, I cannot for a moment think that this is what Bach the innovator would have wanted to hear. This is primarily a crowd pleaser, a set to charm everyone in its claws, but at the same time has no pretensions to be anything more that an endless stream of suave tones, with little or no distinction in any of the works. But that said the music is played in a soothing way. It is in my opinion best suited to play at a low level in the background, and from there move on to interpretations that have something meaningful to say. This is a middle of the road performance that will do for people that start with Bach Organ Works. It's consistency is palatable for beginners and it does not stress your ears too much. There are moments of beauty in Stockmeiers playing, but those moments never lasts long. He is very much an organist of the old school and as such one has to listen at him. The question of the organs is a valid one to pose. I am personally not a great fan of the modern Kreienbrink organs. As such they are pleasing enough, but I found little in its pipes to please me. 




Thursday, March 10, 2016

Bach, J.S. The Complete Organ Works. Volume 4. The Stockmeier Edition.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Membran.
CD 4 from 10.
Recording dates: Between September 1977 and February 1981.
Recording venues: St, Johann, Osnabruck, and Schlosskirche Bad Iburg.
Running time: 67:38.
Classical relevance: Sample before buying.

Works performed:
18 Chorale (III)
BWV 666-668.

Choralebeartbeitungen aus clavier ubung Teil III (I)
BWV 522,1.
BWV 669-679.

Performed by:
Wolfgang Stockmeier.

Instruments:
Two different Kreienbrink organs.

CD 4 today, and I start to feel more affinity with the performances as I had in the morning. I find that with every CD the interpretation gets better. There is actually a style recognizable that shows consistency and a creative narrative. It is getting more personal and with more expression as the previous discs. So my enjoyment of Stockmeier's view is getting into focus. Sound is better too.
Maybe he had to find his ideal spot in heart and mind. Well it's getting there. I like what I hear.


Bach, J.S. The complete Organ Music. Volume 3.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Membran.
CD 3 from 10.
Recording dates: Between September 1977 and February 1981.
Recording venues: Schlosskirche Bad Iburg and St. Jodokus, Bielefeld, Germany.
Running time: 68:07.
Classical relevance: Depends on your taste. Sample before buying.

Works performed:
Chorale der Leipziger orginalhandschrift. (18 Chorale II)
BWV 654-659.
BWV 661-664.

Performed by:
Wolfgang Stockmeier.

Instruments:
Kreienbrink Organs.

The sound has improved again with the third disc. And in style and commitment they have improved also remarkably.  There is more intensity, attention to details, and a firmer narrative. So let's hope that disc 1 was made under less than ideal circumstances. I actually start enjoyed some of it, though not all. It's something I will play on my secondary system, because its essential easy to listen to. And I can do other stuff at the same time as well.



Bach, J.S. The complete Organ Works. The Stockmeier Edition. CD 2.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2106.
First listen.
Label: Membran.
CD 2 from 10.
Recording dates: Between 14 September 1977 and February 1981.
Recording venues: Wallfahrtskirche, Rulle, St. Jodokus, Bielefeld, St Goar, Flieden bei Fulda. Germany.
Recording engineer: Not mentioned.
No booklet.
Classical relevance: Sample before you buy, it might be for you or not.

Works recorded:
Orgelbuchlein III.
BWV 633-644.

6 Chorale von verschiedener Art. ( Schubler Chorale)
BWV 645-650.

Achtzehn Chorale (I) 
BWV 651-653.

Performed by:
Wolfgang Stockmeier.
Instruments:
All Kreienbrink, 3 different ones.

As with the first CD the Orgelbuchlein is more or less easy listening, but I have to make an exception for the other pieces. These are much more to my liking, it is as if Stockmeier is suddenly wide awake, and gives the music what is their due. Expression and colour, sensible tempi, concentrated effort to get more detail. So the overall picture is much better as I was wont to expect after the first encounter. The Schubler Chorale are done in a context of excellence, and although I do not like the Kreienbrink organ very much, I enjoyed the last part of this disc nevertheless. Stockmeier is a man of leisure and not really prone to get in a passion about Bach. Balanced, quiet, solemnly in the Lutheran spirit, no playfulness but strict to the letter. After reading a lot about Bach and his way of playing the organ, I am almost certain that he would have found Stockmeier not the ideal performer of his works.  
The sound is better as with the first disc.



Schubert, Franz. The Complete Symphonies. Symphony No. 2.

New acquisition.
Bought in January 2016.
First listen.
Label:  Zig-Zag territories.
Recording dates: January 1997.
Recording venue: Concertzaal, Tilburg, The Netherlands.
Recording engineer: Bert van der Wolf.
Running time: 33:00.
Classical relevance: Essential if you want your Schubert on Authentic instruments.

Works performed: 
Symphony No. 2, D 125 in A flat major. (1815)

Works performed by:
Anima Eterna Brugge, Jos van Immerseel.

The first Symphony in this set was a huge disappointment to me, performance and sound wise. I thought that Marriner on Philips was way ahead of him in nuance and in regard to Newbould's critical edition. The second Symphony is altogether a different kettle of fish. This is what I expected in the first but was not realized. Superb tempi, fast and furious with plenty of detail and forward push. The fierce lilt in the first movement had me on the edge of my chair, rhythms are dancing all over the place, joyfully bouncing against each other, with some powerful expression throughout the movement. The second movement has a good tempo, very detailed in the lower strings and woodwinds, it moves swiftly without being hurried. The Menuetto has a more deliberate tempo, not much different from what one can expect.  The Presto-Vivace movement blows you out of your chair, again like the first movement fast and furious, without losing sight of the details. The sound is much better too, not the heaviness of the timpani in the first Symphony. The overall picture is lucid, and one can actually hear all the notes clear and separated, especially in the timpani, instead of a booming one note sound, now differentiated.  





Vaet, Jacobus. (c.1529-1567) Volume I. >>Continuo lacrimas<< Requiem and Motets. First recordings

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: January 2002.
Recording venue: Musikwerkstatt Schlosspark, Ebnet (Freiburg) Theodor Egel Saal.
Recording engineer: Manuel Braun.
Running time: 53:24.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works recorded:
See heading.

Performed by:
Dufay Ensemble, Eckehard Kiem.

This CD came with extensive laudations from all quarters of the classical world, so when this CD was offered for just 2,99 € I could not believe my luck and ordered it forthwith. 
As we can read in the booklet >>he was one of the most highly regarded and well known composers of his generation<< So the question that follows naturally out of this fact is, why was he utterly forgotten? It simply happened with many composers from his time and afterwards. No particular reason. The artistic quality of his works could not be higher, so it's a surprising conclusion that most of us did not know Vaet. This recording however is putting his music on the map again. >>His strong cadential harmonies, polyphonic expression, giving a brightness to the music, that makes it captivating in every aspect of his composition style. His expression is rather wide ranging, and the variety of colours simply amazing. He sits comfortably between Josquin on the one side and Palestrina on the other.<< As the booklet says>> A feeling of timelessness, tranquility, solemnity and comfort predominate<<
The singing of the Dufay Ensemble is one of refinement, perfect balance in the voices, dynamics and volume between the voices near ideal. They listen to each other well, and reminded me a bit of Singer pur. What I think a slight blot on this recording is the countertenor Alain Ebert, who can be a bit too forward in his volume, and sometimes obscures the lines of the other soloists. It never gets uncomfortable but still, I noticed.
The sound is very good. Highly recommendable.




Bach, J.S. Complete Organ Works. Orgel Buchlein II. The Stockmeier Edition.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Membran.
Volume II, CD 1 from 10.
Recording dates: September 1977 & February 1981.
Recording venue: Wallfahrtskirche, Rulle. Germany.
Recording engineer: Not mentioned.
Info on box: Tells me that the recordings are in MONO, but I doubt that for all recordings started from 1977 upwards to 1981. There is no booklet. Recording dates and venues only.
Classical relevance: For easy listening these recordings are perfect, and for beginners in this genre.

Works recorded:
Orgelbuchlein II.
BWV 611-632.

Performed by:
Wolfgang Stockmeier.

Instrument:
Kreienbrink Organ, built in 1969.
It has three manuals, (Hauptwerk-Ruckpositiv-Brustschwellwerk and a total of 35 stops.
(Mechanischer Traktur und Elektrischer koppelanlage) 
I could not find more about this organ, (Temperament or tuning)

I could buy this second volume of Stockmeiers Bach for just 4,99€, thus it was the perfect opportunity to listen to what this old master had to say. For me it's easy listening Bach, that will appeal to those that have very little knowledge with Bach's organ works, but for those that want to be challenged be it musically and intellectually, this is a no go area. The sameness and the very slow tempi make it  a late nightcap that will sent you easily into slumbers. It has no highs neither lows, it is a bit faceless. I could not find noticeable expressions that made some impression. I play it this moment in the background and that will do for me, but it does not allow me to turn up the volume and listen more carefully, as I did last night. It made me turn it of after 10 minutes. I do not much like the Organ used, it's a rather flat recording without being bad.
So my recommendation is for those that do not have a distinctive hearing, or like their Bach in the background.




Friday, March 4, 2016

Di Lasso, Orlando. (1532-1594) Motets.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: Ars Musici.
Recording dates: March 1998.
Recording venue: Klosterkirche Windberg/Bogen, Germany.
Recording engineer: Christoph Frommen.
Running time: 62:30.
Classical relevance: Essential.

Works performed:
Motets

Nicolas Gombert. (c.1495-c.1560)
Tous les regrez.

Performed by: 
Singer Pur.

So after reading all positive reviews of this disc, and happen to get it for a very good price, I took my chances, although I knew from previous recordings the quality of singing. And I was not disappointed at all. The same gentle approach, the finely detailed singing, the excellent diction, phrasing, and the homogeneity of the choir as an ensemble, it's all perfect and fully deserves my attention, which as a consequence carries my recommendation. Orlando di Lasso is not a composer, who makes the tasks for singers easy. His works are highly complicated polyphonic structures, which one can never approach in a light fashion. And Singer Pur does not fail in that task one bit. It flows out of their throats and hearts as if it were the easiest things to do. And that is the reason why this performance is so precious, for they emulate the dark sound, favoured by the composer, and do it so well, that you will need to search high and low to find more thoughtful readings as the present one. So even if you have this music already in your collection, it is worth to add this one too.
A fine recording.






Bach, CPE. (1714-1788) Three sonatas for Harpsichord and Violin.

New acquisition.
Bought in March 2016.
First listen.
Label: NCA.
Recording dates: June 2001.
Recording venue: Nagyborzsony, Hungary.
Recording engineer: Veronika Vince.
Running time: 70:34.
Classical relevance: Well worth your attention.

Works performed:
Sonata in B minor/F major/C minor.

Works performed by:
Geoffrey Thomas, Harpsichord.
Laszlo Paulik, Violin.

First of all I want to say that the booklet written by Geoffrey Thomas is the most lucid I ever read. Not in words incomprehensible to most listeners, but spoken in terms of emotions, with a clear but understandable intellectualism to give it weight in higher quarters. The musical weight is also considerable. Where his father is an almost unsurmountable pillar to get around, his son has its own signature, quite different from his father, but not less impressive. Carl is speaking in a language that is easy to approach, its invitation to listen is a warm one, and the underlying message is clear. The narrative between both instruments has a sublime character and  speaks in everyday emotional occurrences. The compositions are highly approachable and pleasing to the ear and mind. It has the contemplation, pre romanticism, the ebb and flow of life. It is hard not to like these works, certainly if they come in such good performances, and well recorded too. For me this is a very recommendable disc, especially for the measly 2,99€ I paid.



Thursday, March 3, 2016

Homilius, Gottfried August. (1714-1785) Complete Organ Chorales.

Third and Fourth rerun.

Homilius has his home close to my heart. I find his music utterly wonderful. And especially these performances by Felix Marangoni.

See my enthusiastic reviews.

First review of both discs



Muffat, Georg. (1653-1704) Apparatus musico-organisticus 1690. CD 2.

Third rerun.
One of the best performances I ever heard of these works.

See  first review.

First review of CD 2.



The Leiden Choirbooks Volume III. (De Leidse Koorboeken) Second rerun.

A second rerun of Volume III. The Leiden Choirbooks. Disc 1 & 2. As lovely as with the first hearing. You might read the first review I...